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Hmong

02

Jun
2014

3 Comments

In Activities
Culture
Travel
Vietnam

By kanannie

Trekking in Sapa with the Hmong

On 02, Jun 2014 | 3 Comments | In Activities, Culture, Travel, Vietnam | By kanannie

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The rice terraces of Sapa.

During a motorcycle ride to a nearby Red Dao village, N’s driver tried to sell her on using him and his buddy for another adventure into the hills. When she tried to explain to him that we wanted to do a trekking tour, he laughed and asked her, “Why walk when you can just drive there?” Good question.

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It was too dry for some of the terraces to be planted.

Well mostly because it’s easier to take in the views at a snail’s pace (which is us going up mountains) than on the back of a motorcycle that is careening around the mountains while simultaneously trying to bypass fast-moving cars and semis. The way these Vietnamese drive, it’s a wonder they manage to stay on the road at all sometimes.

So we signed up for a private trek with Sapa O’Chau, a tour organization founded by a Hmong woman, Shu Tan. Part of the cost of the tour goes towards the schooling of Hmong children to give them better opportunities through future employment. Attendance at the Sapa O’Chau school also includes food and lodging for the children. Our guide was a 20-year young Hmong girl who didn’t attend the school but did take English classes at the school. She was going to lead us to her home in Lao Chai, a big Black Hmong village about 10km from Sapa. Not long into the start of our hike through the town to Sapa, two Hmong women sidled up next to us to chat us up. “What your name?”

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A few water buffalo led the way in the beginning of our trek.

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A duck resting in the shade of the bamboo.

By this time, we were used to the Hmong women following tourists around town pretty assertively. “You buy something from me?” A no thank you will be quickly countered with a gentle, “Yes thank you.” And telling them that you already bought a lot of things will be answered with, “But not from me.” Surprisingly, the women are civil and friendly to each other even though they all crowd around selling the exact same things: little bags, zippered purses, pillowcases, bracelets, charms. “You buy something small from each of us and make us happy.” It’s a proposal we would consider if not for the dozens of other women who will ask you to do the same thing a minute later. And they’re all so damn nice, which makes it hard to say no. The Hmong learn their English from talking to tourists, and it’s pretty damn impressive. They speak way better English than the Vietnamese vendors we’ve interacted with over the past two months.

We didn’t mind buying from these two women, and they didn’t seem to mind walking all the way to Lao Chai with us. My lady (I say this because she chatted me up first) was cheerful and talkative, while N’s lady was quiet and wove hemp strands into string as she walked. I don’t understand this multitasking business, because our eyes were permanently glued to the uneven pathways as we walked and half-stumbled along. Oh, and I forgot to mention that they wear plastic sandals on these walks.

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Making hemp string for weaving clothes.

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Gom leading the way down into a village.

“You have a boyfriend?” I told Gom that I didn’t have a boyfriend, and she reassured me — a pathetic spinster in her eyes — that being single was good because I had the chance to do anything I wanted. She told us about how she recently married a guy who was a friend of her ex-boyfriend’s. She told us about a Hmong custom where a boy will ask a girl he is interested in to come live in his house for four days. She is expected to go, and she spends time with him and his family to see if she would be happy there as his wife. At the end of the four days, the girl decides if she wants to marry the boy. This is what happened with Gom, and while she wasn’t crazy about her husband, he was nice enough so it was OK. She turned her attention to us. “Everyone thinks you two look like boys,” she giggled. I told her that it happens a lot, and left her to wonder why.

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Some of us hens like other hens.

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29

May
2014

No Comments

In Vietnam

By kanannie

Exploring the Land of Fairies and the Red Dao People

On 29, May 2014 | No Comments | In Vietnam | By kanannie

If you really want to explore Sa Pa and the surrounding area, you need to get a motorbike. My first attempt at driving Kanako on the back of a rental motorbike in Phong Nha almost resulted in a couple of scraped knees and an early divorce, so we decided to hire motorbike drivers in Sa Pa to ensure the longevity of our marriage.

Black Hmong motorbike

A happy Black Hmong family on a motorbike. Boo didn’t look this happy when I was driving.

Unlike most travelers to Sa Pa, we decided to spend almost a week there. We like to be out of the city as much as possible and it’s not always easy because transportation is less available and less reliable when you’re leaving major cities, so when we have a chance to get out, we try to stay out for awhile. It gives us time to relax, recharge and, most importantly, catch up on Game of Thrones. OH. MY. GOD. THE. VIPER.

Sapa mountain pass

Wouldn’t you rather be here than in a dirty city?

Daenerys

Daenerys riding around Sa Pa. She’s my favorite, in case you didn’t know.

Finding a motorbike driver, also known as xe om, is easy in Sa Pa. They’re all hanging out on the corner of the main square waiting for people to come by and there’s a big board with prices to popular sites so ignorant tourists like us won’t get ripped off. The more proactive drivers roam around the town asking tourists if they need a motorbike. We decided to use the services of one of these guys to visit the two main waterfalls in the area, Silver Falls and Love Falls. The ride itself is worth the money. The unobstructed view of the mountainside on the back of a motorbike is stunning and the mountain air is refreshing as long as you’re not unlucky enough to get stuck behind a water buffalo that just dropped off a steaming turd. I’d also pay that money twice over to avoid the vomit-inducing minivan ride on the same road.

motorbike driver

Our happy driver enjoying a plum on the side of the road.

Girl on motorbike

Our other driver snacking on a hard-boiled egg. She’s a speed demon.

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This is the only way to travel in Sa Pa.

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Thank god the oxen didn’t try to mate with us.

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Don’t be fooled by their peaceful demeanor. They won’t hesitate to drop a turd in front of your motorbike.

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An ox costs about $2000 USD and is a very valuable asset.

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