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01

Jul
2013

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In Manic Mondays
Russia
Travel

By kanannie

Just Another Manic Monday #10

On 01, Jul 2013 | No Comments | In Manic Mondays, Russia, Travel | By kanannie

Goodbye, gryphons! Strolling along the canal on our last night in Russia.

gryphons in St. Petersburg

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24

Jun
2013

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In Manic Mondays
Russia
Travel

By kanannie

Just Another Manic Monday #9

On 24, Jun 2013 | No Comments | In Manic Mondays, Russia, Travel | By kanannie

Our first Russian Orthodox Cathedral: St. Basil’s Cathedral in Moscow.

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22

Jun
2013

One Comment

In Russia
Travel

By kanannie

Movin’ On Up: First-Class on the Trans-Siberian

On 22, Jun 2013 | One Comment | In Russia, Travel | By kanannie

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The vast and beautiful Siberian landscape

After riding kupe and platzkart for the first two legs of our Trans-Siberian trip, we decided that we had earned and deserved an upgrade on the last and longest leg of the trip, Irkutsk to Moscow, a 76-hour marathon style train ride. The two first-class tickets cost a pretty penny, almost double the price of kupe, but they were worth every red ruble.

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A Russian Railways train at Irkutsk station

We left for the train station at the asscrack of dawn since I don’t like messing around with Russian transportation. Since Irkutsk is one of the major stops on the route the train stops there for at least 30 minutes and when we arrived at the platform our train was already waiting for us. There were two carriage attendants to greet us with the expected non-smiling Russian face and after we presented our tickets and passports they made us wait a few minutes on the platform with our heavy backpacks while they prepared our cabin. Once we entered our cabin we could immediately see the luxurious difference between first-class (spalny vagon), and our previous platzkart ride. The spalny vagon cabins look like the kupe cabins but they only have two lower berths instead of two on the bottom and two on top. The sheets were pure white and clearly of a higher thread count, which was more suited to our first-class tastes. We even had two fluffy pillows each! I also noticed that we were provided with wooden hangers because everyone knows that first-class people need to hang their shit up. No more wire hangers!

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Our luxury cabin on Rossiya 001

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NO MORE WIRE HANGERS!!!

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18

Jun
2013

2 Comments

In Food
Russia
Travel

By kanannie

Irkutsk & Lake Baikal

On 18, Jun 2013 | 2 Comments | In Food, Russia, Travel | By kanannie

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We stumbled off of the train gasping for fresh air sans body odor of unshowered military boys and found ourselves in our first big city in Russia: Irkutsk. I hadn’t expected such a sprawling city in the middle of Siberia, and we were excited to see what it had to offer. We had booked a room at the slightly pricier Angara Hotel for the first night so we could unwind a bit. This ended up being a mistake, because besides paying $150 for the room, the amenities were scarce, our appliances were broken and the staff was totally and utterly useless. I mean, they couldn’t give a shit at all about anything (apparently this is the Russian way, confirmed by quite a few Russians), including helping us. But we were able to get some rest, do some laundry (we have laundry bar soap and my trusty rope from Korea’s eMart that we use as a clothesline) and we were recharged for the next few days in the city.

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Living it up in Russia with our hand-washed laundry.

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Sunset in Irkutsk from our hotel window, with Kirov Square below.

The next day, we walked through town to the Irkutsk train station, where we walked from the end of one line to another at the ticket sales area because the concept of lining up in an orderly fashion is a foreign concept here and if you give the slightest indication of hesitation, the Russians will cut in front of you. Our godsend was a friendly police officer who spent a good 15 minutes with us, trying to help us buy our tickets on a machine.

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Nice police officer trying to use the ticket machine.

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17

Jun
2013

4 Comments

In Russia
Travel

By kanannie

Ridin’ Dirty, Russian Style

On 17, Jun 2013 | 4 Comments | In Russia, Travel | By kanannie

The view of Lake Baikal from our train.

This view of Lake Baikal made the platzkart more bearable.

For many foreigners, riding the Trans-Siberian rail across the vast Russian countryside is a once-in-a-lifetime travel adventure. Most of us have romanticized visions of sitting in a cozy and comfortable train car while idly staring at the passing scenery. If you’re really a dreamer you might even have fantasies of meeting a kindly Russian who speaks accented but perfect English and she’ll be an absolutely perfect cabin mate for the next seven days. She’ll be easy on the eyes, smell nice and even share her black caviar, homemade blinis, and vodka with you. And, of course, she’ll have an advanced degree in Russian history and enlighten you with her vast knowledge of her country. Before you know it, you’re at the end of your 7-day, 9,289km trip and you and Tatiana exchange emails and promise to keep in touch.

Keep dreaming, silly foreigner.
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16

Jun
2013

One Comment

In Russia
Travel

By kanannie

Ulan Ude: The Capital of the Buryat Republic

On 16, Jun 2013 | One Comment | In Russia, Travel | By kanannie

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Grandfather Lenin watching over us

The first multi-day stop on our Trans-Siberian trip was in the small city of Ulan Ude, the capital of the Buryat Republic and the home of Tibetan Buddhism in Russia. Even though religion was banned in communist Soviet Union, Stalin allowed the Buryats to maintain and practice Buddhism to thank the Buryatia for their help defending the country during World War II. Up until 1990, the city was closed to visitors due to nearby strategic military posts, but it’s quickly becoming a favorite stop on the Trans-Siberian route due to the uniqueness of the culture and a couple of attractions that are definitely worthwhile. The city itself is one of the poorer cities in Russia, but it is quickly changing. Even though the Buryats are a minority in the city, their presence is very apparent in the food and culture. Since the Buryats have more Asian features, it almost felt like we were in an Asian city rather than a Russian city.

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Hot girl band singing in the plaza

The next day, we got our bearings and walked over to check out the world’s largest Lenin head sculpture in the middle of the city. The massive head is 7.7 meters tall and weighs 42 tons and it’s awesome to see in person. There wasn’t much else to do besides stare at it for a few minutes and snap some pictures like proper tourists. We noticed that it must be a legal requirement to get at least a few wedding pictures there because there were no less than three bridal parties taking pictures with Grandfather Lenin.
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14

Jun
2013

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In Russia
Travel

By kanannie

Trans-Siberian Rail Journey: Leg 1 of 3

On 14, Jun 2013 | No Comments | In Russia, Travel | By kanannie

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Day 1: Into the Wild

With my heart in my throat, N and I boarded the Rossiya train for the first leg of our journey to Ulan-Ude, the capital of the Buryat Republic smack in the middle of Siberia. The kupé (second class) cabin was surprisingly modern and unlike anything we had seen in photos in guidebooks and on blogs. The toilets I had been nervously anticipating ended up being like an airplane toilet; not the best situation, but at least they weren’t the old lever-style toilets which flushed the contents of the bowl directly onto the tracks below.

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Passing the time in our second-class cabin as we chug through Siberia.

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Our narrow but modern Rossiya train corridor.

The first few hours passed quietly, with only the two of us in the cabin for four. My fever was back and I crawled up to my top bunk hopped up on aspirin and passed out. I had expected to be constantly jostled around in a loud, screeching train so I was surprised by how quiet it actually was. In the afternoon, we were greeted by “Ni hao!”s as a new cabinmate and her husband boarded the train at one of the small towns that we stopped at. After kisses goodbye, our cabinmate’s husband left and we were off again.

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10

Jun
2013

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In Manic Mondays

By kanannie

Just Another Manic Monday #7

On 10, Jun 2013 | No Comments | In Manic Mondays | By kanannie

On a ferry to Russia. Thank gawd for seasickness medicine. Don’t ask me why there’s a dinosaur sculpture on the boat. Must be a Korean thing.
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Baking an apple pie with our CS host. Mmmmm.
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10

Jun
2013

One Comment

In Travel

By kanannie

Eastern Dream: A Ferry Tale

On 10, Jun 2013 | One Comment | In Travel | By kanannie

How to get from South Korea to Russia without flying

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Sunset over North Korea (We didn’t actually see NK but it’s over there somewhere.)

If you want to get to Russia from South Korea and you don’t want to fly in a rusty old tin can of an airplane or pay a ridiculous amount of money to fly on Korean Airlines I’d recommend the Eastern Dream ferry from Donghae to Vladivostok. It’s operated by a Korean company called DBS Ferry and connects Japan, South Korea and Russia.
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25

Apr
2013

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In Travel

By kanannie

My First Visa

On 25, Apr 2013 | No Comments | In Travel | By kanannie

We went to apply for our Russian tourist visa today. This is the first time in my adult life applying for a visa to visit another country. Luckily for me, I picked a country with a rather complex tourist visa application process, especially for a US citizen. They practically asked for a blood sample. It also cost me ¥10480, but I’m not sure if that’s because I’m applying for it in Japan or if that’s the cost in general for a US citizen. KS didn’t have to pay a dime. I hope we get it!

Waiting for our Russian visa…

Waiting for visa

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